A Guide To Generating Secure Passwords

We’ve all heard of horror stories where people have been locked out of their account because someone had cracked their password. We’ve heard of the stories where sites have been compromised because of easy to remember passwords.

Here’s a list of commonly used passwords from 2012

1. password
2, 123456
3. 12345678
4. abc123
5. qwerty
6. monkey
7. letmein
8. dragon
9. 111111
10. baseball
11. iloveyou
12. trustno1
13. 1234567
14. sunshine
15. master
16. 123123
17. welcome
18. shadow
19. ashley
20. football
21. jesus
22. michael
23. ninja
24. mustang
25. password1

Passwords are meant to be secure and hard to crack or guess. Well, guess what? Most of these passwords can be cracked almost instantly.

Here are a few guidelines to making your passwords secure.

Make Secure Passwords

Stay away from dictionary words

The easiest to crack passwords are those that are in the dictionary. If you are going to make a password, avoid words like, garden, flower or anything that can be taken from an english dictionary.

Make it long

A short password is an easier to crack password. It should be a rule of thumb to make your password at least 8 characters long.

Character Variety

Make a password that contains numbers and letters. Adding a symbol can make it more secure. A nice trick is to replace letters with symbols. For example, @ for a, e with 3, i with ! and s with $.

Don’t make a personal reference

Don’t make it easy for someone you know to guess your password. Don’t use any resemblance to your birthday, your telephone number or your anniversary.

No Repeated Patterns

Repeated patterns make your passwords more predictable.

Password Generators

It is hard to make a password. Not just any password but difficult to crack/guess passwords. Password generators are abound for people having a hard time making their passwords secure.

Random.Pw

Random.Pw helps you generate not so easy to remember passwords. It also makes a guess on how long a desktop computer would crack your generated password.

PasswordBird

PasswordBird makes use of 2 words and a date you would likely remember. It combines them to make a password. I won’t really recommend it but it would be better than the passwords we have presented above :)

Password Savvy

Let’s you choose your words and it mashes it up to generate secure passwords. These passwords usually pass our 5 rules.

Last piece of advice

There can never be an uncrackable password. Make a password and make it secure.

PS

It is usually a rule of thumb for security to change your passwords regularly.

 Web Developer Weekly: JS Frameworks and Ruby

Every week, I plan to publish an article to highlight the newest news about web development. Let’s face it! We, as web developers, need to be updated somehow of the latest developments.

We are experiencing the fastest growth in technology the world has ever seen. We cannot afford not to know what’s happening. Especially in the world of web development.

Here is the first batch of developments this week.

Basic Javascript

Dr. Axel Rauschmayer writes a blog post about Javascript. It focuses on getting started with JavaScript as quickly as possible.

AngularJS: An Overview

AngularJS is a JavaScript framework made by Google for building complex client-side applications. I love AngularJS and wish to work with it in some project in the future. Glenn Stovall writes an overview of the framework.

Backbone.js Pts 1 – 5

Backbone. Backbone. Backbone. We can’t get enough of it. Why not? It’s quickly becoming an essential skill in web development today. You can’t go around and not hear about it. MetaCasts offers a paid tutorials for those who want to learn more about Backbone.

Puma vs Phusion Passenger

I honestly haven’t used Puma but I have been using Phusion Passenger as my ruby web server of choice lately. I have no idea what differs between the two. This article points out some differences between the two.

How to install Ruby & Rails with screencasts: Linux, Mac OS X, Windows

I have mostly used Ubuntu and Mac for Rails development. Here’s a screencasts for those Windows fanatics that want to work with Ruby on Rails.

 Practical LS Command Usages

The ls is my most used command when working with files especially working with command line stuff.

ls is a command to list files in Unix and Unix-like operating systems. While, ls on its own is quite useful, there are a few more options you can use to work with ls to make it superb!

Hidden Files

ls -la

The a option makes a list of files include files that are hidden. Files like .htaccess, .rvmrc and .gitignore, which are normally hidden, be seen.

total 80
drwxr-xr-x  23 teejay  staff   782 Jul  9 14:16 .
drwxr-xr-x  54 teejay  staff  1836 Jul  4 15:38 ..
drwxr-xr-x  17 teejay  staff   578 Jul  9 18:13 .git
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   541 Jul  9 14:16 .gitignore
drwxr-xr-x  12 teejay  staff   408 May 29 09:14 .idea
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff    29 Apr 25 09:53 .rvmrc
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   352 Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff  2759 Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile.lock
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff    33 Apr 25 01:21 README.md
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff  9220 Apr 25 01:21 README.rdoc
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   281 Apr 25 01:21 Rakefile
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272 Apr 25 01:21 app
drwxr-xr-x  10 teejay  staff   340 Apr 25 11:04 config
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   166 Apr 25 01:21 config.ru
drwxr-xr-x   5 teejay  staff   170 Jul  9 14:16 db
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102 Apr 25 01:21 doc
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 01:21 lib
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 11:03 log
drwxr-xr-x   7 teejay  staff   238 Apr 25 01:21 public
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102 Apr 25 01:21 script
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272 Apr 25 01:21 test
drwxr-xr-x   6 teejay  staff   204 Apr 25 11:03 tmp
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 01:21 vendor

Human readable format

ls -h

The -h option makes a small formatting change to the filesize of files

total 64
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   352B Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   2.7K Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile.lock
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff    33B Apr 25 01:21 README.md
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   9.0K Apr 25 01:21 README.rdoc
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   281B Apr 25 01:21 Rakefile
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272B Apr 25 01:21 app
drwxr-xr-x  10 teejay  staff   340B Apr 25 11:04 config
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   166B Apr 25 01:21 config.ru
drwxr-xr-x   5 teejay  staff   170B Jul  9 14:16 db
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102B Apr 25 01:21 doc
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136B Apr 25 01:21 lib
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136B Apr 25 11:03 log
drwxr-xr-x   7 teejay  staff   238B Apr 25 01:21 public
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102B Apr 25 01:21 script
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272B Apr 25 01:21 test
drwxr-xr-x   6 teejay  staff   204B Apr 25 11:03 tmp
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136B Apr 25 01:21 vendor

Order by Date Modified

The -t is useful if you want to see the last modified files first.

ls -lt
total 64
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   352 Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff  2759 Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile.lock
drwxr-xr-x   5 teejay  staff   170 Jul  9 14:16 db
drwxr-xr-x  10 teejay  staff   340 Apr 25 11:04 config
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 11:03 log
drwxr-xr-x   6 teejay  staff   204 Apr 25 11:03 tmp
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff    33 Apr 25 01:21 README.md
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff  9220 Apr 25 01:21 README.rdoc
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   281 Apr 25 01:21 Rakefile
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272 Apr 25 01:21 app
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   166 Apr 25 01:21 config.ru
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102 Apr 25 01:21 doc
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 01:21 lib
drwxr-xr-x   7 teejay  staff   238 Apr 25 01:21 public
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102 Apr 25 01:21 script
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272 Apr 25 01:21 test
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 01:21 vendor

Order by Date Modifed(Reverse)

-t accompanied by -r reverses the order by making the last modified file last.

ls -lt
total 64
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 01:21 vendor
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272 Apr 25 01:21 test
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102 Apr 25 01:21 script
drwxr-xr-x   7 teejay  staff   238 Apr 25 01:21 public
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 01:21 lib
drwxr-xr-x   3 teejay  staff   102 Apr 25 01:21 doc
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   166 Apr 25 01:21 config.ru
drwxr-xr-x   8 teejay  staff   272 Apr 25 01:21 app
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   281 Apr 25 01:21 Rakefile
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff  9220 Apr 25 01:21 README.rdoc
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff    33 Apr 25 01:21 README.md
drwxr-xr-x   6 teejay  staff   204 Apr 25 11:03 tmp
drwxr-xr-x   4 teejay  staff   136 Apr 25 11:03 log
drwxr-xr-x  10 teejay  staff   340 Apr 25 11:04 config
drwxr-xr-x   5 teejay  staff   170 Jul  9 14:16 db
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff  2759 Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile.lock
-rw-r--r--   1 teejay  staff   352 Jul  9 14:16 Gemfile

List Files (No other information)

ls -1
Gemfile
Gemfile.lock
README.md
README.rdoc
Rakefile
app
config
config.ru
db
doc
lib
log
public
script
test
tmp
vendor

Comma separated list of files (No other information)

ls -lm
Capfile, Gemfile, Gemfile.lock, Guardfile, README.md, README.rdoc, Rakefile, app, config, config.ru, db, doc, lib, log, public, script, spec, test, tmp, 
vendor

 Display a Calendar in the Terminal Window

How Do I Display a Calendar in the Terminal Window

For those who love the command line, the cal command helps display a calendar. It can show the calendar in a variety of ways like yearly or monthly.

Show the current month Code:
cal

Result:

     July 2013
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1  2  3  4  5  6
 7  8  9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
Show a specific month

Code:

cal 08 1983

Result:

    August 1983
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1  2  3  4  5  6
 7  8  9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
Show the current year

Code:

cal -y 2013

Result:

                            2013
      January               February               March
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
       1  2  3  4  5                  1  2                  1  2
 6  7  8  9 10 11 12   3  4  5  6  7  8  9   3  4  5  6  7  8  9
13 14 15 16 17 18 19  10 11 12 13 14 15 16  10 11 12 13 14 15 16
20 21 22 23 24 25 26  17 18 19 20 21 22 23  17 18 19 20 21 22 23
27 28 29 30 31        24 25 26 27 28        24 25 26 27 28 29 30
                                            31
       April                  May                   June
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1  2  3  4  5  6            1  2  3  4                     1
 7  8  9 10 11 12 13   5  6  7  8  9 10 11   2  3  4  5  6  7  8
14 15 16 17 18 19 20  12 13 14 15 16 17 18   9 10 11 12 13 14 15
21 22 23 24 25 26 27  19 20 21 22 23 24 25  16 17 18 19 20 21 22
28 29 30              26 27 28 29 30 31     23 24 25 26 27 28 29
                                            30
        July                 August              September
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1  2  3  4  5  6               1  2  3   1  2  3  4  5  6  7
 7  8  9 10 11 12 13   4  5  6  7  8  9 10   8  9 10 11 12 13 14
14 15 16 17 18 19 20  11 12 13 14 15 16 17  15 16 17 18 19 20 21
21 22 23 24 25 26 27  18 19 20 21 22 23 24  22 23 24 25 26 27 28
28 29 30 31           25 26 27 28 29 30 31  29 30                                            
      October               November              December
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa  Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
       1  2  3  4  5                  1  2   1  2  3  4  5  6  7
 6  7  8  9 10 11 12   3  4  5  6  7  8  9   8  9 10 11 12 13 14
13 14 15 16 17 18 19  10 11 12 13 14 15 16  15 16 17 18 19 20 21
20 21 22 23 24 25 26  17 18 19 20 21 22 23  22 23 24 25 26 27 28
27 28 29 30 31        24 25 26 27 28 29 30  29 30 31